Tag Archives: midwifery

Positive Birth in South Africa: This is Tarryn Walton


The Gate-Keepers: A Portraiture Project

This is a portraiture project, documenting the “gatekeepers” of a growing movement regarding positive birth experiences in our country.  My aim: to promote those who are enabling women to identify with their power and femininity and therefore normalize birth and the body.

These are their stories / anecdotes / opinions about what they do and how they see it…accompanied by my portraits and some general information on each sitter.

Tarryn Walton has been a professional doula for two years now. She works all over: Northern suburbs, Cape Town central, southern suburbs, Atlantic seaboard.
Tarryn is a  Satyananda yoga teacher and specialises in prenatal yoga as well.
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Tarryn Walton Doula South Africa photographed by Leah Hawker

Giving birth to three children in the UK, has highlighted the stark difference between South Africa and England regarding the approach to childbirth.
My aim is to help educate women in terms of their choices in childbirth, encourage them to believe and trust in their ability to birth their babies with as little interference and medical intervention as possible.
In instances where a non-medicalised birth is not an option, I aim to work with the mother and her family towards optimising the chances of her having a positive experience.
A woman should feel safe, nurtured and empowered throughout pregnancy, labour and birth. She should own the experience and be able to congratulate herself on her achievement.
Helping facilitate this is an honour and a privilege.
• (I invite more participants to join the project, you are welcome to email me for more information).
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Positive Birth in South Africa: This is Candice Petersen


The Gate-Keepers: A Portraiture Project

This is a portraiture project, documenting the “gatekeepers” of a growing movement regarding positive birth experiences in our country.  My aim: to promote those who are enabling women to identify with their power and femininity and therefore normalize birth and the body.

These are their stories / anecdotes / opinions about what they do and how they see it…accompanied by my portraits and some general information on each sitter.

Candice Petersen is a South African midwife working in the public sector. She’s an advanced midwife with a background in nursing. Candice worked at Mowbray Maternity Hospital for 7.5 years before she moved to Khayelitsha District Hospital where she stayed for 5 months. She is currently working at Mitchell’s Plain District Hospital.

Candice Petersen Midwife South Africa - Photographed by Leah Hawker

My journey to midwifery began after the birth of my daughter nearly 17 years ago. I had a negative experience during my labour. Despite this, the moment i gave birth, I was in awe. It was wonderful. It was then that I decided to become a midwife.

I completed my training as a professional nurse in 2007. I started working at a specialised obstetric hospital in the government sector. Much has changed over the years in this sector with regards to birthing. Most of the old practices have been stopped (shaving, enemas, routine episiotomies, etc). Most hospitals have become more baby and mother friendly.

However, I do still believe that birthing in S.A is largely medicalized. The caesarean section is amongst the highest in the world.

I am still often shocked by the lack of patient care I see around me, the protocols are just something I often can’t agree with,- there is just so much intervention!

It often seems to me that the system is setting patients (in labour) up for failure (caesarean). I have often just felt that patients were being treated like livestock and not people. Each place I have worked at has been quite different, some definitely have much more evident care and compassion for the labouring woman however some facilities are incredibly hard to work at, psychologically…

What it means to me to be a midwife in the dominant world of medicine is to be an advocate for the women who are in my care. To ensure that her experience during labour is positive and without fear, that she may birth as she intends with the least intervention. I have come to experience many times that a softer approach and reassurance to the mom yields far greater results than a strictly clinical approach.

To engage with my patients and gain their trust, to share in their joy, their sorrow and to help to dispel their fears means so much to me.

The statistics I would like to see is a decline in the Caesarean section rate in this country. I believe we can achieve this by adopting more natural approaches to birthing. Women need to be empowered. Empowerment through education. There is too much fear surrounding birth, which in its essence, should be a natural, instinctive and physiological event.

• (I invite more participants to join the project, you are welcome to email me for more information).

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A Home Birth Gathering
Cape Town, November 2014

HomeBirth Gathering Cape Town 001

Birth and pregnancy have pretty much always interested and fascinated me. The body’s ability to house, create and nourish as well as birth another perfect being is a marvel.
The first time I really read or looked into birth was through a book by Dr Christiane Northrup called Women’s Bodies Women’s Wisdom when I was at school (amazing birth stories as well as attitudes towards the body and birth) and I also count myself lucky that I was surrounded by the kind of people, teachers, friends and parents alike, that were open to a more natural way of being (probably because it was a Waldorf School).

I heard about the Home Birth Gathering through Facebook and followed links to the event and other connected websites. The gathering was held in a beautiful old mansion in Muizenberg with about 22 guests and two hosting midwives/doulas Lana and Ruth. The gathering was relaxed and basically an open conversation with questions, answers and discussions about a mix of things related to birth.
Questions raised by other attendees ranged from concerns about what the most common problems one could face during labour, how midwives are equipped, how long it would take to get to a hospital should the situation arise and the subject of when to cut the umbilical cord if at all (see Lotus Birth).

HomeBirth Gathering Cape Town 003

Ive started doing a lot more research online into birth, clinics, midwifery, etc as I’m really excited to shoot more on this subject, in fact, attending a natural birth is on my “bucket list”.

I noticed how people looked quizzically at me when I said I was attending a home birth gathering and realised how I felt I had to defend myself about going which is bizarre.
Ive been reading so much about the taboos associated with the subject as well as how women have such differing ideas and experiences of the pregnancy and the birth process.

More on home birth on Lana & Ruths great resource website here.

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